Good.co lets you see how well your personality matches up with specific companies and employees, so you end up at a place that’s really the right fit for you.
It offers job hunters a way to find companies that are a better fit and companies a way to find employees who are a better fit, so neither waste more time and money than necessary.

Job listings can give you a sense of whether you’re qualified for a particular role, but not necessarily whether you’re a good fit for the company and its culture. One new website hopes to change that.

Good.co, which launched in beta last month, classifies job hunters and companies into different personality types based on a proprietary algorithm and provides a score that shows how well the two match up. The goal is to help job hunters better understand their own strengths and improve the odds that businesses, employees and teams will be well matched for one another, and thrive together as a result.

When you sign up to use the site, you’ll be asked to fill out a quick questionnaire developed by an experimental psychologist on the staff. Each question includes two answers with a sliding scale to indicate where you fit on the spectrum. You’ll be asked whether you would start the race more like the tortoise or the hare, whether you would rather be a character on Friends or Survivor and if you would prefer to have a signed contract or a standing ovation. Based on those responses, Good.co will break down your different personality archetypes, each of which are represented by iconic figures. There are 16 archetypes in all, including the Dreamer (John Lennon), the Straight Shooter (Stephen Colbert) and the Visionary (Steve Jobs.)

Good.co also creates a personality breakdown for hundreds of major companies based on brand perception, revenue growth, the size of the company’s staff and other data, as well as conducting similar surveys of those posting jobs. Based on this information, you can get some sense of how well you might fit at a company or even a career you might be interested in.

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